The Wheels of Wine | Roll out the Knowledge | Victory Wine | VICTORY WINE AND SPIRITS INC.

The Wheels of Wine | Roll out the Knowledge | Victory Wine

So much for the theory of not reinventing the wheel. Well, a different kind of wheel! The professors at UC Davis (a prominent school in California) created the Wine Aroma Wheel. It is affectionately known in the community as the Davis Wine Aroma Wheel. 

We are paying homage to it and it should facilitate your development as a wine enthusiast and ever-blossoming connoisseur. 

WHO WAS THE PIONEER OF THIS WHEEL? 

Ann C. Noble invented the "Aroma Wheel" which is credited with enhancing the public understanding of the tasting of wine and those lovely terms. 

WOMEN IN WINE 

At the time of her hiring at UC Davis in 1974, Noble was the first woman hired as a faculty member of the Viticulture department. 

NOBLE 

What an ironic name she has - in the most positive sense!

OBJECTIVITY IS THE KEY  

Noble discovered that there was no objective framework or widely agreed upon terminology that a wine taster could use to describe things such as "earthy" aromas or the different smells of various fruits that can appear in wine. In 1984, her research lead her to develop the "Aroma Wheel" 

BACK TO THE NEW WHEEL 

The Davis Wine Aroma Wheel is divided into several sections to help you visualize the different flavors, scents and aromatic qualities found in most red and white wines regardless of the variety. 

YOUNG WINES 

Young wines and young vines.

What are primary aromas? 

Initially tasters will experience what is known as primary aromas.

Early Scents

These early scents come predominantly from the fruits, which include notes of berries, grape, cherry, strawberry, boysenberry, cassis, blueberry, blackberry and black cherry in red wines.

In white wines, the early aromatic qualities most often expressed range from citrus top apple, pear, pineapple or other tropical fruits. Young wines often offer coffee, vanilla or chocolate notes from the oak, as well as floral, stone, licorice and jammy scents.

Jam away with the rest! 

SECONDARY SCENTS 

Age and time. With time and bottle age, wines develop secondary or tertiary qualities which add layers of depth and complexity a wines bouquet. Some of the more easily recognizable tertiary aromas include tobacco, truffle, earth, spice box, chocolate, smoke, crushed stone and cigar box. These secondary qualities are prized as only the worlds’ best wines are capable of aging and developing these additional layers of complexity.

What is NOBLE DOING NOW? 

Noble currently teaches classes domestically and internationally. She also continues to work as a wine judge.

More books 

She participates in meetings concerning Wine, Science, and Sensometrics in the U.S. and overseas. She is also writing a book on Wine Sensory evaluation 

 

AN ODE TO WOMEN IN WINE  

Always remember that the world of wine has a place for you if you are looking for a switch of scenes. Seek the opportunity and you shall find. 

An ode to your sipping as well with Young Vines and Coup De Coeur. Love of the world and show our appreciation to those, like Noble, that knowledge is illuminating. 

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